Saturday
Nov132010

Contributors' Notes

Issue Sixteen: November 2010


 

Andrew Borgstrom is the author of the chapbooks Explanations (The Cupboard, 2010), And What Is Left... (Greying Ghost, 2011), and Pig Others (Mud Luscious, 2011). He lives a $6.90 ferry ride from Seattle and can be found online in the Matted Welcome Desert.  

Alex Gallo-Brown is a writer living in Portland. His work has appeared or is forthcoming in The Brooklyn Rail, Rain Taxi, Pop Matters, and Bunker Hill Magazine. He blogs intermittently at poemboxer.blogspot.com.

Cathy Linh Che is a Vietnamese-American writer from Southern California. She recently received fellowships from Poets & Writers, Kundiman, The Center for Book Arts, and the Fine Arts Work Center at Provincetown. She co-edits Paperbag: an online journal of the arts and is collecting work for an anthology called Inheriting War.

David James' second book, She Dances Like Mussolini, won the 2010 Next Generation Indie Book Award for poetry. His one-act plays have been produced from New York to California. He teaches at Oakland Community College.

Maya Janson’s poetry has appeared in The Harvard Review, Rattle, Barrow Street, Jubilat, Best American Poetry and other journals.  She lives in Northampton and is an adjunct professor of poetry at Smith College.

A. Van Jordan is the author of Rise, published by Tia Chucha Press, 2001; M-A-C-N-O-L-I-A, 2004, and Quantum Lyrics, 2007, both published by W.W. Norton & Co. He is a Professor in the Dept. of English at the University of Michigan.

Nick Kocz’s short stories have appeared or are forthcoming in Black Warrior Review, Hobart (online), Mid-American Review, The Normal School, and PANK.  A past editor of The New River (the oldest continually-operating journal devoted to hypertext and digital literature), he is an Associate Editor for both Keyhole and FutureCycle Flash.

Gavin Pate is the author of the novel The Way To Get Here (Bootstrap 2006) as well as short stories in places like Perigee, Barrelhouse, Dogmatika, The Project for a New Mythology, and The Southeast Review.  "Lost Girls: A Beginning" has been wishy-washy, some days downright stubborn, about its place in his new novel, and if it keeps acting that way, may just have to sit on the bench.  He teaches at Virginia Wesleyan College in Norfolk, VA.

Caleb Powell lived overseas and taught English as a Second Language (ESL) for eight years and his ESL guide, The World is a Class, was published in Canada. He now makes Seattle his home with his wife and three daughters. His fiction is forthcoming or in descantMonkeybicycle, and Post Road and he has reviews forthcoming or in various places, including dooneyscafe.com, Fourth Genre, and The Los Angeles Review. He blogs here.

Chad Simpson lives in Monmouth, Illinois, and teaches writing and literature classes at Knox College. His chapbook, Phantoms, was released in April by Origami Zoo Press. New work has appeared or is forthcoming in Orion Magazine, matchbook, Wigleaf, and Crab Orchard Review.

Kellie Wells is the author of a collection of short fiction, Compression Scars, 2001 winner of the Flannery O’Connor Award, and a novel, Skin, published in the Flyover Fiction Series, by the University of Nebraska Press. "Gaythal Dethloff" is from a novel entitled Fat Girl, Terrestrial. She teaches in the Creative Writing Program at the University of Alabama.

Tom Williams is associate editor of American Book Review. He has published reviews, fiction and essays in such journals as Boulevard, Chelsea, Indiana Review and Night Train. His novella, The Mimic’s Own Voice, is forthcoming in 2011 from Main Street Rag Publishing.

Charles Dodd White was born in Atlanta, Georgia, in 1976. He currently lives in Asheville, North Carolina, where he teaches writing and literature at South College. He has been a Marine, a flyfishing guide, and a newspaper journalist. His short fiction has appeared or is forthcoming in Night Train, North Carolina Literary Review, Pequin, VerbSap, Word Riot, and other publications. Lambs of Men, his first novel, is being released by Casperian Books in November 2010. You may visit the author's website at www.charlesdoddwhite.com.