Friday
Mar092012

Contributors' Notes

Issue Thirty-Two: March 2012


 

Ark Codex ±0 is a book published recently by Calamari Press.

Luke B. is a writer of fictions, living in Texas. He teaches at a Texas university and his work has appeared in journals including: the New York Tyrant, Unsaid, Pank, Elimae, Wigleaf, Gigantic, Everyday Genius, and one soon to print with Kitty Snacks. He works as a Co-Editor with The New York Tyrant and Tyrant Books.

Terry Blackhawk is the founding director of Detroit’s InsideOut Literary Arts Project (www.insideoutdetroit.org) and the author of six collections of poems including Escape Artist (BkMk Press), winner of the John Ciardi Prize, and The Light Between (2012) from Wayne State University Press. Recent work is in Michigan Quarterly Review, Florida Review, When She Named Fire: Contemporary Poems by American Women and Nimrod, which awarded her the 2010 Pablo Neruda Prize.  She lives in Detroit and blogs for HuffPost Detroit. 

Myfanwy Collins was born in Montreal, Canada, grew up in the Adirondack Mountains of New York State, and now lives on the North Shore of Massachusetts with her husband and son. Her work has been published in The Kenyon Review, AGNI, Cream City Review, Quick Fiction, and Potomac Review. A collection of her short fiction is forthcoming from PANK Little Books in August 2012.

Eugene Cross was born and raised in Erie, Pennsylvania and received an MFA from The University of Pittsburgh. His stories have appeared in Narrative Magazine (which named him one of “20 Best New Writers” and his story “Harvesters” a “Top Five Story of 2009-2010”), American Short Fiction, Story Quarterly, TriQuarterly, and Callaloo, among other publications. His work was also listed among the 2010 Best American Short Stories' 100 Distinguished Stories. He is the recipient of scholarships from the Bread Loaf Writers’ Conference and the Chautauqua Writers' Festival, and the winner of the 2009 Dzanc Prize for Excellence in Literary Fiction and Community Service. He currently lives in Chicago where he teaches in the Fiction Department at Columbia College Chicago.

Gabe Durham is the author of Fun Camp, a novel forthcoming from Mud Luscious Press. He lives in Northampton, MA, where he edits Dark Sky Magazine

T Fleischmann's first book, Syzygy, Beauty, is out from Sarabande this month. They live in rural Tennessee and help edit nonfiction at DIAGRAM.

Adam Gallari is the author of We Are Never as Beautiful as We Are Now. His essays and reviews appear widely both in print and online. He holds an MFA from the University of California, Riverside and is currently a a PhD candidate at the University of Exeter in Southwest England. 

Lauren Groff's first novel, The Monsters of Templeton, published in February 2008, was a New York Times Editors’ Choice selection and bestseller and was shortlisted for the Orange Prize for New Writers. Her second book, Delicate Edible Birds, is a collection of stories. Her second novel, Arcadia, will be published on March 13, 2012.

Kevin "Mc" McIlvoy has been a teacher for thirty years. He offers mentoring and manuscript critique through mcthebookmechanic.com. He lives in Asheville, North Carolina where he has a place in the woods, and behind that place a writing hut.  His newest work is a collection of stories, The Complete History of New Mexico, published by Graywolf Press; it will be released in e-format in late 2012. "When will we speak of Jesus?" (which appeared in Issue 31 of The Collagist) and "Mrs. Wiggins altocumulus undulatus asperatus" are from an almost-completed new work, 57 Octaves Below Middle C.

Joe Milazzo is co-founder of the interdisciplinary arts organization Strophe, co-editor of the online journal [out of nothing] and proprietor of Imipolex Press. His writings have appeared in HTMLGiantAntennaeDrunken Boat, H_NGM_N, and Black Clock, as well as the anthologies Chronometry and Conversations at the Wartime Cafe: a Decade of War 2001-2011. His The Terraces (Das Arquibancadas) will be published later this year as part of the Little Red Leaves Textile Series. Joe lives and works in Dallas, TX, and his virtual location is http://www.slowstudies.net/jmilazzo/.

Reese Okyong Kwon's stories are published or forthcoming in the Southern Review, Ploughshares, Kenyon Review, American Short Fiction, and elsewhere. She has received scholarships from the Bread Loaf Writers' Conference and Ledig House International, and has been named one of Narrative's "30 Below 30" writers." She can also be found at www.reesekwon.com.

Stephanie Lenox is the author of The Heart That Lies Outside the Body, an award-winning poetry chapbook published by Slapering Hol Press. Congress of Strange People, a full-length poetry collection, is forthcoming from Airlie Press in fall 2012. A recipient of a 2010 Oregon Art Commission artist fellowship, she lives in Salem, Oregon, where she teaches poetry at Willamette University and edits the online literary journal Blood Orange Review.

Rachel Levy's prose can be found in places like Drunken Boat, Everyday Genius, and PANK. Her first chapbook is forthcoming from Ghost Ocean Magazine. She lives in Boulder, CO.

Mitchell R. McInnis is a poet and writer. He is the author of the collection The Missing Shade of Blue and is the cofounder of the arts journal HoboEye.

Joe Milazzo is co-founder of the interdisciplinary arts organization Strophe, co-editor of the online journal [out of nothing] and proprietor of Imipolex Press. His writings have appeared in HTMLGiant, Antennae, Drunken Boat,H_NGM_N, and Black Clock, as well as the anthologies Chronometry and Conversations at the Wartime Cafe: a Decade of War 2001-2011. His The Terraces (Das Arquibancadas) will be published later this year as part of the Little Red Leaves Textile Series. Joe lives and works in Dallas, TX, and his virtual location is http://www.slowstudies.net/jmilazzo/.

Ansley Moon was born in India and has since lived on three continents. Her work has been published or is forthcoming in PANK, Mascara Literary Review, J Journal, Southern Women's Review and elsewhere. She is the author of the poetry collection How to Bury the Dead (Black Coffee Press, 2011) and the forthcoming fiction chapbook All Seemed Foreign (ńĆervená Barva Press, 2012) and she is an editor for The Furnace Review and Black Lawrence Press. She currently lives in Brooklyn, New York.

Nate Pritts is the author of five books of poetry, most recently Sweet Nothing.  His poetry & prose have been published widely, both online & in print & on barns, at places like Forklift, Ohio, Court Green, Untoward, and PopMatters, as well as Rain Taxi and Boston Review where he frequently contributes reviews. He is the founder & principal editor of H_NGM_N, an online journal & small press.

Mark Snyder’s play As Wide As I Can See  just finished a run at HERE in a production by At Hand Theatre in New York. His plays include A Decent Stretch (to be produced by The Claque's QandD series in April), Lila Cante, Corsets, Wipe Away, The Beanbag Game, Lilith on Today, and The Sounds of Ice. For three summers, he hosted and performed in Red Light Nights at New York’s The Slipper Room (Firecracker Productions). His plays have been produced and developed in New York, Chicago, San Francisco, and Portland. His interviews and essays have appeared in Paste, The Rumpus, The Brooklyn Rail, The New Gay, Queerty, ThePeeq, and at Maud Newton.com, and he has read new work at Pete’s Candy Store (courtesy of the2ndHand.com) and throughout downtown NYC. BA, Otterbein College. MFA, Ohio University. Mark was born in Warren, Ohio and lives in Brooklyn.

Daniel Torday’s fiction and nonfiction have appeared in Esquire Magazine, Glimmer Train, Harper Perennial’s Fifty-Two Stories, Harvard Review and The Kenyon Review. He currently serves as Director of Creative Writing at Bryn Mawr College.

Karrie Waarala holds an MFA from the Stonecoast Program at University of Southern Maine. Her work has appeared or is forthcoming in journals such as Iron Horse Literary Review, PANK, Arsenic Lobster, Radius, and The Orange Room Review. Karrie recently debuted her one-woman show, LONG GONE: A Poetry Sideshow, which is based on her poems about the circus, to critical acclaim. She really wishes she could tame tigers and swallow swords.

Adam Wilson is the author of the novel Flatscreen (Harper Perennial, 2012). His writing appears in many publications including The Paris Review, Bookforum, and The New York Times. He is the 2012 recipient of the Terry Southern Prize, which recognizes “wit, panache, and sprezzatura in work published by The Paris Review,” and his short story, “What’s Important Is Feeling,” was recently chosen for inclusion in Best American Short Stories 2012. He teaches creative writing at NYU, and lives in Brooklyn.

Matthew Wollin is a writer and award-winning filmmaker based in New York City. He has written for multiple publications, including The Awl and Word Riot. His films have shown in the Brooklyn Film Festival and the Columbus International Film and Video Festival. He attended Williams College.