Thursday
Jun062013

Contributors' Notes

Issue Forty-Seven: June 2013


 

Aaron Burch's debut collection, Backswing, is due from Queen's Ferry Press in 2014. He is the editor of Hobart: another literary journal.

Susan Daitch is the author of three novels, L.C.The Colorist, and Paper Conspiracies, and a collection of short fiction, Storytown. Her short stories and essays have appeared in Conjunctions, Guernica, Tablet, Tin House, and elsewhere. She is the recipient of a New York Foundation for the Arts fellowship and two Vogelstein grants. Her first novel was the recipient of both an NEA Heritage and Lannan award. Fall Out, a novella, will be published in May 2013 by Madras Press in support of Women for Afghan Women. Susan lives in Brooklyn with her son and can be found at: www.susandaitch.com.

John Domini's latest novel is A Tomb on the Periphery. He has a selection of poetry, The Grand McLuckless Road Atlas, coming in 2013, and a selection of essays and reviews, The Sea-God's Herb, in 2014. This story is part of a developing sequence he's calling MOVIEOLA! 

Gabe Durham's debut novel, Fun Camp, just came out from Publishing Genius Press. Pieces of the book have appeared in over 25 journals and magazines, including The Good Men Project, Corium, and Necessary Fiction. Gabe lives in Los Angeles, tweets @Gabe Durham, and holds it down at Gather Round Children.

Benjamin Garcia, originally from Albuquerque, New Mexico, received his MFA from Cornell University and now resides in Auburn, New York. A CantoMundo fellow, he has received scholarships from the Bread Loaf Writer's Conference and the Taos Summer Writer's Conference. His work has appeared in Poet Lore, torhouse.org, and as part of the 200 New Mexico Poems anthology.

Christian Anton Gerard's first book Wilmot Here, Collect For Stella is forthcoming from WordTech Communications in 2014. He's the recipient of Pushcart Prize nominations, scholarships from the Bread Loaf Writers' Conference and an Academy of American Poets Prize. His recent poems and essays appear in Redivider, Pank, B-O-D-Y, Apt, The Rumpus, and The Journal. Gerard lives in Knoxville with his wife, Lucy, and their son. He is editor of Grist: The Journal for Writers and an English Ph.D. candidate at the University of Tennessee.

April Naoko Heck was born in Tokyo and relocated with her family to the U.S. when she was seven. Her first collection of poems, A Nuclear Family, is due from UpSet Press in fall 2013. A Kundiman fellow, she works for the NYU Creative Writing Program and lives in Brooklyn. 

Tyler McMahon is author of the novel How the Mistakes Were Made (St. Martin's, October 2011) and a professor at Hawaii Pacific University. His short work has appeared in The Antioch Review, Three Penny Review, The Rumpus, and The Nervous Breakdown. His next novel, Kilometer 99, will be released in 2014. More information is available at www.tylermcmahon.net.

Jordaan Mason is a filmmaker, musician, and writer. His writing has appeared in UNSAID, The Scrambler, Everyday Genius, NOÖ Journal, and red lightbulbs. He lives in Toronto with his husband and his cats. Find him online at http://globeandmale.tumblr.com/.

Richard Melo is a novelist in Portland, Oregon, and the author of Happy Talk and Jokerman 8. A graduate of San Francisco State University, he is also a book critic with reviews appearing in The Believer, Publishers Weekly, and the Oregonian.

James Orbesen is a writer and adjunct living in Chicago. His work has appeared on or in Salon, The New Humanism, Jacobin, Midwestern Gothic, Bookslut, PopMatters, 215 Ink's Ignition anthology, and elsewhere.

Lauren Perez is a graduate of USC with publications in The Alarmist, Bartleby Snopes, and Corvus Magazine, and she still hasn't figured out what to put in these statements. She's hoping that's what she'll learn in her MFA program.

Alicia Jo Rabins is a poet, composer, performer and teacher based in Portland, OR and Brooklyn, NY. Her poems appear in Ploughshares, 6x6 and the Boston Review. She holds a MFA from Warren Wilson and has received fellowships from Bread Loaf Writers Conference and Lower Manhattan Cultural Council. Rabins tours internationally with her band, Girls in Trouble, and is currently completing her first manuscript of poems. 

Carmen Giménez Smith is the author of a memoir, Bring Down the Little Birds, four poetry collections— Milk and FilthGoodbye, FlickerThe City She Was, and Odalisque in Pieces. She is the recipient of a 2011 American Book Award, the 2011 Juniper Prize for Poetry, and a 2011-2012 fellowship in creative nonfiction from the Howard Foundation. Formerly a Teaching-Writing Fellow at the Iowa Writers' Workshop, she now teaches in the creative writing programs at New Mexico State University, while serving as the editor-in-chief of the literary journal Puerto del Sol and the publisher of Noemi Press. 

Jaclyn Watterson's work has appeared in Fringe, elimae, PANK, and elsewhere. She lives in Salt Lake City and works as a fiction editor at Quarterly West.