Saturday
Nov082014

Contributors' Notes

Issue Sixty-Four: November 2014


 

Nora Boydston is the founder of Cartwheels for Justice and prose editor of the literary journal Broke. She earned her MFA in fiction at the New School and currently lives in Chicago where she teaches English to speakers of other languages.

Laura Clarke lives and writes in Toronto. She is a graduate of University of Toronto’s MA in Creative Writing program and the winner of the 2013 RBC Bronwen Wallace Award for Emerging Writers from the Writers’ Trust of Canada. Her work has been published in various journals including The Antigonish Review, Grain, PRISM international, and Qwerty. Her first full-length poetry collection is forthcoming from ECW press in 2015.

Vincent Colistro's poetry has appeared in various publications, including The Walrus, Hazlitt and Geist. His first book of poetry, Late Victorians, is forthcoming with Vehicule Press. 

Eduardo C. Corral is the author of Slow Lightning, which won the 2011 Yale Series of Younger Poets competition. He's the recipient of a Whiting Writers' Award and a fellowship from the National Endowment for the Arts. He teaches in the low-residency MFA program at Pacific University. He lives in New York City.

Kayla Czaga is the author of For Your Safety Please Hold On (Nightwood Editions, 2014). Her poetry, fiction, and nonfiction have been published in The Walrus, Best Canadian Poetry in English 2013, ARC Poetry Magazine, and EVENT, among others. She lives in Vancouver, BC.

Alex Franks is a graduate of the University of Edinburgh, Scotland. He is a writer, editor, and teacher currently residing in Nashville, Tennessee. His reviews regularly appear in Foreword Reviews and Kirkus

Originally from Dallas, Texas, Marin Heinritz teaches journalism and creative writing at Kalamazoo College in Michigan. She is at work on a memoir about coming of age with cancer. 

Leah Horlick is a writer and poet from Saskatoon. A 2012 Lambda Literary Fellow in Poetry, she holds an MFA in Creative Writing from the University of British Columbia. Her first collection of poetry, Riot Lung (Thistledown Press, 2012) was shortlisted for a 2013 ReLit Award and a Saskatchewan Book Award. She lives on Unceded Coast Salish Territories in Vancouver, where she co-curates REVERB, a queer and anti-oppressive reading series. Her next book, For Your Own Good, is forthcoming from Caitlin Press in spring 2015.

Nick Kocz's short stories have appeared or are forthcoming in a number of places, including Another Chicago Magazine (ACM), Black Warrior Review, Five Chapters, Mid-American Review, and The Pinch. Like everyone else, he's working on a novel. And maybe a few more stories. But mostly he's kept busy by his three rambunctious kids.

Carmen Lau's stories have appeared in the Collagist, Gigantic, Fairy Tale Review, Hayden's Ferry Review and other journals. She is currently working on a collection of "hometown stories."

Meredith Luby holds an MFA in fiction from Brown University. Her work can be found in, or is forthcoming from, The Broome Street Review, NightBlock Magazine, Fourteen Hills, Redivider, and Glimmer Train Stories. She resides in North Carolina.

Tyler Mills is the author of Tongue Lyre, winner of the 2011 Crab Orchard Series in Poetry First Book Award (SIU Press, 2013). Her poetry has recently appeared or is forthcoming in Blackbird, the Believer, the Boston Review, and POETRY. She lives in Chicago, where she is a Ph. D. candidate in poetry at the University of Illinois-Chicago and editor-in-chief of The Account: A Journal of Poetry, Prose, and Thought.

Michael Prior's poems have most recently appeared in Geist, The Malahat Review, The New Quartely, and Prism International. He was the winner of Vallum's 2013 Poetry Prize, Magma's 2014 Editors' Prize, and Grain's 2014 Short Grain Contest. His first book is forthcoming in 2016 from Signal Editions.

Youssef Rakha is the author of seven books in Arabic. His fiction, criticism, and journalism have appeared widely, including in the New York Times, McSweeney’s, the Kenyon Review, and the Atlantic; his novel The Crocodiles is also forthcoming in English.

Doug Rice is the author of Blood of Mugwump (selected by Kathy Acker asrunner-up Fiction Collective First Novel Award, 1996), Das Heilige Buchder Stille (Solitude Press, Stuttgart, 2013, an original book, German translation by Nicolai Kobus), Between Appear and Disappear (Jaded Ibis Press, 2013), Dream Memoirs of a Fabulist (Copilot Press, 2011), Le Sang des Mugwump (French translation of Blood of Mugwump by Heloise Esquii, Desordres Laurence Viallet, Paris, France, 2007), Skin Prayer (Eraserhead Press, 2002), A Good Boy is Hard to Find (CPAOD Books, 1998). He is the co-editor of Federman: A to X-X-X-X (San Diego State University Press, 1998). His fiction, memoirs and creative nonfiction has appeared in numerous anthologies and journals including: Avant Pop: Fiction for a Daydream Nation, Kiss the Sky, The Dirty Fabulous Anthology, Alice Redux, Phanthoms of Desire, Zyzzyva, Gargoyle, Fiction International, Discourse, 580 Split, and others. He has been a Literature Fellow at the Akademie Schloss Solitude and teaches at Sacramento State University.

Paul Starkey served as head of the Arabic department at Durham University, UK, and a co-director of the Centre for the Advanced Study of the Arab World, until his recent retirement. His translations include works by Adania Shibli, Mansoura Ez Eldin, and Edwar al-Kharrat.

Derek Webster received an MFA in Poetry from Washington University in St. Louis, where he studied with Carl Phillips, Erin Belieu and Yusef Komunyakaa. His first collection of poems appears spring 2015 with Véhicule Press. His poems have appeared in Boston Review, The Malahat Review, Agni, BOMB and elsewhere, and he is the founding editor of Maisonneuve, an award-winning magazine of arts, opinion and ideas. He lives in Montreal.

Wyatt Williams lives in Atlanta and writes about food for a living. His work has appeared in the Paris Review Daily, The Literary Review, Necessary Fiction, BuzzFeed, Fanzine, and elsewhere.

Daniel Zomparelli is the Editor-in-Chief of Poetry Is Dead magazine. He is a co-podcaster at Can’t Lit. His first book of poems Davie Street Translations was published by Talonbooks. His collaborative book with Dina Del Bucchia, Rom Com, is forthcoming from Talonbooks, fall 2015.